27
Feb
2012

Matt Mason on Creative Disruption, Piracy, Transmedia and Ecosystems

Matt Mason currently serves as Executive Director of Marketing at BitTorrent, a creator of advanced, innovative technologies designed to efficiently deliver large files across the Internet. BitTorrent currently boasts over 150 million active monthly users, and moves 20-40% of all Internet traffic on a daily basis.

He is also the bestselling author of The Pirate’s Dilemma, the first book in the history of the world to hit the number one spot on Amazon’s economics/free enterprise bestseller list and the rap bestseller list at the same time. It has since been published in ten countries and counting. He is also a board member at PopTech, a global community of innovators, working together to expand the edge of change.

He began his career as a pirate radio and club DJ in London, going on to become founding Editor-in-Chief of the seminal music magazine RWD. In 2004, he was selected as one of the faces of Gordon Brown’s Start Talking Ideas campaign, and was presented the Prince’s Trust London Business of the Year Award by HRH Prince Charles.

Matt works across a range of media and has written and produced TV series, screenplays, comic strips, apps and records, not to mention award-winning, global advertising campaigns. His journalism has appeared in The Guardian, The Independent, The Observer Music Monthly, Dazed & Confused, Adweek, VICE, Complex, Liberation and other publications in more than 20 countries. His short story Hard Times was published by Penguin as part of the We Tell Stories project, which won Best in Show at SXSW and was shown in the Talk To Me exhibition at the MOMA in New York City in 2011.

Matt Mason regularly speaks on creativity, disruptive innovation, copyright infringement and the promise of P2P technologies all over the world.

In this conversation with the Creative Activism class Matt discusses some of his work: covering issues around piracy and control in the creative industries, new ways of working and thinking about engagement, corporate responsibility and changes in advertising, transmedia storytelling and how creatives need to be thinking through working with emerging ecologies and ecosystems for the sustainability of their practice.

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14
Feb
2012

Comedy, Satire and Change with James Cook, Stand-up Comedian

In this talk and workshop comedian James Cook explores the role of comedy as a part of public debate, as well as taking a look through how comedy has responded and reacted to politics and issues in society.

He also talks through a few useful techniques to get you thinking about using comedy in your creative work.

You can find out more about James by following him on Twitter or check out the News With Jokes podcast series that he has created.

If you'd like to find the links to the material that James was discussing please visit the Creative Activism Website

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13
Feb
2012

Social Entrepreneurship and Creative Visions – Charles Tsai from Social Creatives

Charles Tsai is a journalist, writer, speaker and consultant for social entrepreneurs.

A former reporter and producer for CNN, Charles ventured into the social sector to help youth design and implement their own solutions for change. He helped Ashoka launch its first global campaigns to support youth-led social ventures. Now, he has launched SOCIAL Creatives, a new framework to learn, teach and practice social entrepreneurship. He also works with the Creative Visions Foundation.

In this podcast he discusses along with some useful tips for activists who want to get their messages heard and acted on. You can find out more about Charles Work on his website http://www.charlestsai.com/

7
Feb
2012

Agitpop – Protest and Social Change in Popular Music – Chris Jury

Chris Jury (Broadcaster, Lecturer and Activist) discussing his radio show called Agitpop- and shares some of his work and reflections on pop and protest as part of the Creative Activism Open Class

You can download the slides and tracklist from Chris' show by visiting this page on the Creative Activism class

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5
Feb
2012

Cameras Everywhere: Sam Gregory discussing Video Advocacy at WITNESS

Sam Gregory is a human rights advocate, video producer and trainer. He directs WITNESS‘ programmatic work, including supervising the Campaign Partnerships, Tools & Tactics, and Cameras Everywhere Leadership initiatives. In 2005, he was the lead editor on the handbook Video for Change: A Guide for Advocacy and Activism (Pluto Press), and in 2007, he developed the Video Advocacy Institute, an intensive two-week training program for human rights advocates. He also teaches on human rights advocacy using new media as an Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School.

Over the past decade, Sam has worked extensively with human rights activists, particularly in Latin America and Asia, integrating video into campaigns on a range of civil, political, social, economic and cultural human rights issues. Videos he has co-produced have been screened to decision-makers in the U.S. Congress, the U.K. Houses of Parliament, the United Nations and at film festivals worldwide, and have contributed to changes in policy, practice and law.

In this podcast he discusses the work of WITNESS and its role in enabling human rights advocacy through video.

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1
Feb
2012

‘Newspeak’ Discussion With Radical Documentary Filmmaker Ken Fero

Documentary Filmmaker, Ken Fero from Migrant Media, discusses his documentary called ‘Newspeak’ which was the last film to be broadcast by Press TV on 20th January 2012. The film questions the relationship between Ofcom, the independent regulator and competition authority for the UK communications industries, and power. The film uses poetry and experimental visual techniques to take the viewer on a personal journey to reflect on how the radical content of certain images – deaths in police custody, Occupy London the invasion of Iraq, workers uprisings – remain hidden from UK audiences.

Watch Newspeak on Vimeo. You can also watch Ken’s earlier film called Injustice, an award winning film about deaths in police custody - and here’s a recent Guardian article related to it

Here’s his discussion with the Creative Activism class following the screening of the film.

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1
Feb
2012

#blackout: the viral counterpublicity of online protest – Dr Tessa Houghton

Dr Houghton is Assistant Professor in Media and Communication in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures at the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus. Her co-edited book Nexus: New Intersections in Internet Research (Peter Lang, 2011) brings together collaborative research from the alumni of the 2009 Oxford Internet Institute Summer Doctoral Programme, and she is currently co-editing a volume on flows of online control and resistance. Her research interests include public sphere theory, online activism, digital politics and rights, and the digital divides.

In this talk, given as part of the Open Media series and the Creative Activism Class at Coventry University, she discusses the web blackout that took place on 18/01/12. On this day numerous websites, including Wikipedia and Google, ‘blacked out’ in protest against the ‘Stop Online Piracy Act’ (SOPA) currently being heavily lobbied for within the US political context. This massive online protest will have been many netizens’ first encounter with the #blackout form; however, it is borrowed from previous ‘digital rights’ campaigns in other locations. In 2009, ‘the lights went out’ all over the New Zealand internet as NZ and international netizens participated in the ‘NZ internet blackout’, a ‘performative hacktivist’ campaign (Samuel 2004) that catalysed viral online protest against the threatened domestic implementation of ‘3-strikes’ or graduated response-style anti-filesharing legislation. Despite the eventual passing of the legislation (albeit in much-modified form), the blackout garnered extensive global participation, illustrating the latent counterhegemonic power inherent in hacktivist campaigns.

This presentation interprets the blackout through a critical discourse analysis and a public sphere theoretical framework built upon the radical or agonistic tradition. It shows that socially-mediated counterpublicity can generate successful counterhegemonic projects and even bring about legislative change, and in doing so, makes the argument that our understanding of what the modern public sphere is should allow for more unruly forms of democratically legitimate communication.


Find out about the Digital Media BA (Hons) Degree at Coventry University
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25
Jan
2012

The Art of the Prank and Culture Jamming with Joey Skaggs

Joey Skaggs is a fine artist and social activist. Although he has painted and sculpted throughout his life, starting with his iconoclastic and controversial performance-art protests in the Sixties, his public work took on a new direction. Skaggs realized he could use art to challenge the system. Appalled at the cultural hypocrisy he saw around him, especially how it was blindly supported in the media, he began to satirize social issues with public performances and elaborately contrived media hoaxes. The mass media in turn became an unwitting collaborator in his concepts, reporting his satire as news. Joey Skaggs quickly acquired an international reputation as a cultural satirist and media critic. His work incorporates guerrilla tactics and traditional public relations techniques to promote his staged performances. Few media outlets over the last four decades have not fallen for one or another of his hoaxes. He has been covered in newspapers, magazines, and on radio and television around the world, in some cases many times as different people.

At the School of Visual Arts Joey Skaggs taught Media Communications including “Culture Jamming and Media Activism,” a course of his creation. He also taught at Parsons The New School for Design. He now lectures internationally on divergent approaches to addressing social issues through art. He’s the creator of the Universal Bullshit Detector Watch and the publisher and editor of “The Art of the Prank” blog. A master storyteller, he inspires in his audiences original and inventive insights while sharing the tools and techniques that foster independent thinking, media literacy, and creative activism. Like the Wizard of Oz, he reveals the man behind the curtain, showing, in a visceral way, the influence mass media has on society. http://joeyskaggs.comhttp://artoftheprank.com

In this podcast he talks about some of his work.

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18
Jan
2012

Get your facts straight and do the work for them – John Mair

This weeks guest podcast is from John Mair, who is Broadcaster and Academic.

In this podcast John discusses how he helped to orchestrate a media campaign to stop lorries using the B430 in Weston-on-the-Green. They had been using it as a rat-run to avoid congestion on the M40, causing all kinds of issues within the Oxfordshire village.

John talks about how by using just a laptop, some hard facts, doing journalists work for them and making sure the right people were involved helped the campaign to be successful.

This podcast is part of the Creative Activism Open Class- come and join us.

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12
Jan
2012

Small Acts of Resistance - John Jackson

John Jackson is a New York-based writer and activist originally from London, covering social activism and international affairs. He is co-author of 'Small Acts of Resistance, How Courage, Tenacity and Ingenuity Can Change the World (2010)'. In this talk he discusses the book as well as some useful advice for activists.

This talk is part of the Creative Activism Open Class - Exploring Creativity and Social Change.

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